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" If it may be doubted, whether beasts compound and enlarge their ideas that way, to any degree: this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect... "
Lectures on the Science of Language: Delivered at the Royal Institution of ... - Page 375
by Friedrich Max Müller - 1862
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With the Author's Last Additions ...

John Locke - 1828 - 590 pages
...degree ; this I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them ; and that the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For, it is evident, we...
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Versuch einer wissenschaftlichen Darstellung der ..., Volume 2, Part 1

Johann Eduard Erdmann - 1840
...particular ideas , received from particular objects, to become general. — This is «ailed abstraction. — The having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes. — They have not the faculty of abstracting or making general ideas, since they have no use of words...
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The British Controversialist and Impartial Inquirer, Volume 6

1855
...degree; this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. .... It seems as evident...
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Zoologist: A Monthly Journal of Natural History, Volume 15, Part 1857

1857
...degree : this I think I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For it is evident we observe...
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The National Review, Volume 13

1861
...degree ; this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to." Now precisely these general...
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National Review, Volume 13

1861
...degree ; this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to." Now precisely these general...
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Lectures on the Science of Language, Delivered at the Royal ..., Volume 1

Friedrich Max Müller - 1861 - 399 pages
...degree : this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them ; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to." If Locke is right in...
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Lectures on the Science of Language, Volume 1

Friedrich Max Müller - 1862 - 416 pages
...gather from such isolated cases as when Yon Hammer counts 5,744 words relating to the camel.* The feet that every word is originally a predicate — that...established as preferable to the theories both of Onomatopoiea and of Interjections. But, though our modern philosophy did not know it, the ancient poets...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 91

1862
...before that language is the distinguishing characteristic of man ; it was known also that the having general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brntes ; but that these two were only different expressions of the came fact was not known till the...
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The Christian Review, Volume 28

1863
...it was known also that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction between man and brutes ; but that these two were only different...known till the theory of roots had been established. All naming is classification, bringing the individual under the general In order to call the first...
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