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" If it may be doubted, whether beasts compound and enlarge their ideas that way, to any degree: this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect... "
Lectures on the Science of Language: Delivered at the Royal Institution of ... - Page 375
by Friedrich Max Müller - 1862
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A Dictionary of Science, Literature, & Art: Comprising the ..., Volume 2

William Thomas Brande, George William Cox - 1866
...degree, this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain unto.' But it is obvious that...
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A Dictionary of Science, Literature, & Art: Comprising the ..., Volume 2

William Thomas Brande, George William Cox - 1866
...degree, this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain unto.* But it is obvious that...
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The Moral Gulph Betwixt Man and the Brute: an Essay

Charles Wallwyn Radcliffe Cooke - 1866 - 54 pages
...contrivance or other. Mr Locke advances the opinion that the power of abstracting is not in brutes, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes. For my own part I cannot but think that the power of reflection, an inward sense as it were, which...
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A Dictionary of Science, Literature, & Art: Comprising the ..., Volume 2

William Thomas Brande, George William Cox - 1866
...this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that tho having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain unto.1 But it is obvious that...
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Man: Where, Whence, and Whither: Being a Glance at Man in His Natural ...

David Page - 1867 - 199 pages
...Understanding, " I think I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them ; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to." And Dr. H. Bischoff,...
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Chapters on Man: With the Outlines of a Science of Comparative Psychology

Charles Staniland Wake - 1868 - 343 pages
...affirms all language may be reduced. Following the dictum of Locke,* he asserts that, " the having general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to." He adds,f " If Locke...
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Mediation: The Function of Thought

Henrietta Sullivan - 1871 - 213 pages
...was known also that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction between men and brutes ; but that these two were only different...known till the theory of roots had been established But though our modern philosophy did not know it, the ancient poets and framers of language must have...
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Mediation: The Function of Thought

Henrietta Sullivan - 1871 - 213 pages
...was known also that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction between men and brutes ; but that these two were only different...known till the theory of roots had been established But though our modern philosophy did not know it, the ancient poets and framers of language must have...
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The pure philosophical works

George Berkeley - 1871
...that which puts the widest difference in point of understanding betwixt man and beast. Thus speaks he: 'The having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the facultys of brutes do by no means attain unto. For it is evident we...
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The Works of George Berkeley: Philosophical works

George Berkeley - 1871
...that which puts the widest difference in point of understanding betwixt man and beast. Thus speaks he: 'The having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the facultys of brutes do by no means attain unto. For it is evident we...
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