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" If it may be doubted, whether beasts compound and enlarge their ideas that way, to any degree: this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect... "
Lectures on the Science of Language: Delivered at the Royal Institution of ... - Page 375
by Friedrich Max Müller - 1862
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The Living Age, Volume 118

1873
...degree, this, i think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them ; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For, it is evident, we...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 18; Volume 81

1873
...degree, this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them ; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For, it is evident, we...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science ..., Volume 18; Volume 81

1873
...degree, this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them ; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For, it is evident, we...
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Fraser's Magazine, Volume 88

1873
...degree, this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas is that •which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For, it is evident, we...
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A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

George Berkeley - 1874 - 424 pages
...which puts the widest difference in point of understanding betwixt man and beast. Thus speaks he : ' The having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the facultys of brutes do by no means attain unto. For it is evident we...
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A Dictionary of Science, Literature, & Art: Comprising the ..., Volume 2

William Thomas Brande, George William Cox - 1875
...lingua, think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that tho having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain unto.' But it is obvious that...
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A Philosophical Treatise on the Nature and Constitution of Man, Volume 2

George Harris - 1876
...degree, this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes by no means attain to. For it is evident we observe...
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Max Müller & the Philosophy of Language

Ludwig Noiré - 1879 - 102 pages
...it was known also that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction between man and brutes ; but that these two were only different...established as preferable to the theories both of Onomatopoeia and of Interjections. But though our modern philosophy did not know it, the ancient poets...
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Natural history sketches among the carnivora: wild and domesticated

Arthur Nicols - 1885
...animals : " This, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to," he could never have imagined...
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The Science of Thought

Friedrich Max Müller - 1887 - 664 pages
...Understanding, bk. ii. c. 1 1. par. 10,11,' that the power of abstracting is not at all in beasts ; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For, it is evident, we...
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