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" If it may be doubted, whether beasts compound and enlarge their ideas that way, to any degree: this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect... "
Lectures on the Science of Language: Delivered at the Royal Institution of ... - Page 375
by Friedrich Max Müller - 1862
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Origin Of Language

Roy Harris - 1996 - 332 pages
...degree, this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For, it is evident, we...
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Rousseau: 'The Discourses' and Other Early Political Writings

Jean-Jacques Rousseau - 1997 - 437 pages
...John Locke (1632-1704), An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690; hereafter Essay), n1, 3, vi; "the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes," ib., n, 11, x; cp. n1, u, xvi; and regarding the general idea of a triangle, see 1v, 7, 1X. Rousseau...
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Ideas and Mechanism: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy

Margaret Dauler Wilson - 1999 - 524 pages
...abstract: I think, I may be positive . . . that the power of Abstracting is not at all in them; and ... the having of general Ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt Man and Brutes; and is an Excellency which the Faculties of Brutes do by no means attain to.46 This seems to mean that...
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The Difference Satire Makes: Rhetoric and Reading from Jonson to Byron

Fredric V. Bogel - 2001 - 262 pages
...chapter, when Locke concludes that "the power of Abstracting is not at all in them [ie, beasts]; and that the having of general Ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt Man and brutes" (in; my italics at "perfect distinction"). As in the case of wit and judgment, an anxiety about contaminación...
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White Men Aren't

Thomas DiPiero - 2002 - 338 pages
...degree; this, I think, I may be positive in,—that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to." 148 Reason clearly separated...
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The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition

Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen, Professor of History Philosophy of Science and C Colin Allen, Gordon M. Burghardt - 2002 - 482 pages
...skills. I think, I may be positive . . . that the power of Abstracting is not at all in them; and ... the having of general Ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt Man and Brutes; and is an Excellency which the Faculties of Brutes do by no means attain to. For it is evident, we...
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Visual Thinking

Rudolf Arnheim - 1997 - 345 pages
...passage just quoted, Locke said of animals that "the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes." And Pellet states: "Since the deaf and dumb are limited to their gesture language, which is descriptive...
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Mary Wollstonecraft and the Critics, 1788-2001, Volume 2

Harriet Devine, Harriet Devine Jump - 2003 - 435 pages
...degree: This, I think, I may be positive in, That the power of Abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general Ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt Man and Brutes; and is an Excellency which the Faculties of Brutes do by no means attain to. "[19] It is this context...
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Central Works of Philosophy: The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

John Shand - 2005 - 256 pages
...language, unlike non-human animals, because they have the psychological capacity to form abstract ideas: "the having of general Ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt Man and Brutes; and is an Excellency which the Faculties of Brutes do by no means attain to" (II. xi. 10). These abstract...
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Philosophical Inquiry: Classic and Contemporary Readings

Jonathan Eric Adler, Catherine Z. Elgin - 2007 - 896 pages
...degree: this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and ler and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For it is evident, we...
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