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" God save him ; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home : But dust was thrown upon his sacred head ; Which, with such gentle sorrow he shook off, His face still combating with tears and smiles, The badges of his grief and patience, That had not God,... "
Elements of criticism [by H. Home]. - Page 171
by Henry Home (lord Kames.) - 1817
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The Beauties of Shakespeare: Selected from Each Play : with a General Index ...

William Shakespeare, William Dodd - 1824 - 385 pages
...to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; nomancried,God save him; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home:...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. VIOLETS. Who are the violets now, That strew the green lap of the new-come spring? A SOLILOQUY IN PRISON....
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1824 - 830 pages
...much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried, God save him! Nojoyfultongnegave ign and semblance of her honour : Behold, how like...Comes not that blood, as modest evidence, To witness pi tied him. But heaven hath a hand in these events ; To whose high will we bound our calm contents....
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare, Part 1

William Shakespeare - 1824 - 830 pages
...cried, God save him! No joyful tongue gave him his welcomehome : But dust was thrown upon hissacred head, Which with such gentle sorrow he shook off,...his grief and patience, That had not God, for some strongpnrpose, steel'd The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, And barbarism itself have...
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The dramatic works of Shakspeare, from the text of Johnson and Stevens [sic ...

William Shakespeare - 1824
...scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him; No joy ful tongue gave him his welcome home : But duit was thrown upon his sacred head ; Which with such...and smiles, The badges of his grief and patience, [steel'd That had not God, for some strong purpose, The hearts of men, they must perforce hare And...
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A dictionary of quotations from the British poets, by the author ..., Volume 1

British poets - 1824
...Pour the sweet milk of concord into hell, Uproar the universal peace, confound All unity on earth. Had not God, for some strong purpose, steel'd The...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. I do love thee so, That I will shortly send thy soul to heaven, If heaven will take the present at...
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Shakespeare's English Kings, the People, and the Law: A Study in the ...

Edna Zwick Boris - 1978 - 261 pages
...Whilst all tongues cried "God save thee, Bolingbroke!" men's eyes Did scowl on Richard. No man cried "God save him!" No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home, But dust was thrown upon his sacred head. . . . (5.2.11-30) After arresting the Bishop of Carlisle, Northumberland asks, "May it please you,...
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The Object of Literary Criticism

Richard Shusterman - 1984 - 237 pages
...to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried, God save him No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...perforce have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him."92 Dryden thus argues for the greatness of this passage by so focussing our reading of it that...
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The Works of John Dryden, Volume XIII: Plays: All for Love, Oedipus, Troilus ...

John Dryden - 1985 - 672 pages
...contempt, mens eyes Did scowl on Richard: no man cry'd God save him: No joyful tongue gave him his welcom home, But dust was thrown upon his Sacred head, Which...That had not God (for some strong purpose) steel'd so The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, And Barbarism it self have pity'd him. To speak...
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Shakespeare's English and Roman History Plays: A Marxist Approach

Paul N. Siegel - 1986 - 168 pages
...the face of the crowd's jeering, states (5.2.34-38): "Had not God, for some strong purpose, steeled / The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, / And barbarism itself have pitied him. / But Heaven hath a hand in these events, / To whose high will we bound our calm contents." So, too,...
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Figures in a Renaissance Context

C. A. Patrides - 1989 - 346 pages
...10) The second occasion forms part of York's moving report on Richard after his forced abdication: No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home: But dust...tears and smiles, The badges of his grief and patience .... (V.ii.29-33) The pattern reappears next in King Lear, where it also occurs twice, initially affirmed...
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