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" And that which casts our proficiency therein so much behind is our time lost partly in too oft idle vacancies given both to schools and universities; partly in a preposterous exaction, forcing the empty wits of children to compose themes, verses, and... "
Works - Page c
by Thomas Gray - 1835
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Cyclopaedia of English Literature: A Selection of the Choicest Productions ...

Robert Chambers - 1853 - 716 pages
...forcing the empty wits of children to compose themes, verses, and orations, which are the acts of ripest judgment, and the final work of a head filled by long reading and observing, with elegant maxima and copious invention. These are not matters to be wrung from poor striplings, like blood out...
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Language as a Means of Mental Culture and International ..., Volume 1

Claude Marcel - 1853 - 458 pages
..."forcing the empty wits of children to compose themes, versions, and orations, which are acts of ripest judgment and the final work of a head filled by long reading and observing .... These," he adds, '' are not matters to be wrung from poor striplings, like blood out of the nose,...
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Liber Cantabrigiensis, an Account of the Aids Afforded to Poor Students, the ...

Robert Potts - 1855 - 588 pages
...wits of children to compose themes, verses, and orations, which," says he, " are the arts of ripest judgment, and the final work of a head filled by long...observing with elegant maxims and copious invention." The remark, though directed especially against juvenile essays in the learned languages, applies no...
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Liber Cantabrigiensis, an account of the aids afforded to poor students, the ...

Robert Potts - 1855 - 1050 pages
...wits of children to compose themes, verses, and orations, which, 11 says he, " are the arts of ripest judgment, and the final work of a head filled by long...observing with elegant maxims and copious invention." The remark, though directed especially against juvenile essays in the learned languages, applies no...
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The Poetical Works of Mark Akenside and John Dyer

Mark Akenside, John Dyer - 1855 - 472 pages
...definition of poetry which Milton had given, may appear to be fulfilled ; since, without question, it was the final work of a head filled, by long reading and...observing, with elegant maxims and copious invention. Nor can the art of expert judgment be fairly denied to the author. The reception of the poem, however,...
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The American Journal of Education, Volume 2

Henry Barnard - 1856 - 768 pages
...the empty wits of children to compose themes, verses and orations, •which are the acts of ripest judgment, and the final work of a head filled by long...reading and observing with elegant maxims and copious invention.7 These are not matters to be wrung from poor striplings, like blood out of the nose, or...
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The American Journal of Education and College Review, Volume 2

1856 - 796 pages
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Remarks on and Translation of Milton's Treatise: Of Education

John Milton, Julius Zelle - 1858 - 46 pages
...the task of forming the pupils, who have acquired an universal insight into things and whose head is filled by long reading and observing with elegant maxims and copious invention, to be able write« and composers in every excellent matter. Thence probably it comes that the style...
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School-days of Eminent Men: I. Sketches of the Progress of Education in ...

John Timbs - 1860 - 332 pages
...of the language; for he regards them as " the acts of ripest judgment, and the final work of a ftead filled by long reading and observing, with elegant maxims, and copious invention." He preferred physical studies to humane or moral studies; but like Bacon, he protests against that...
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Treasures from the Prose Writings of John Milton

John Milton - 1866 - 520 pages
...forcing the empty wits of children to compose themes, verses, and orations, which are the acts of ripest judgment, and the final work of a head filled by long...observing, with elegant maxims and copious invention. These are not matters to be wrung from poor striplings, like blood out of the nose, or the plucking...
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