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" Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. "
Merill's Word and Sentence Book: A Practical Speller Designed to Teach the ... - Page 118
by James Ormond Wilson - 1902 - 189 pages
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The Quotable Dad

Nick Lyons, Tony Lyons - 2004 - 332 pages
...necessary to have them pressed so often. JOSEPH P. KENNEDY, TO HIS SON JACK, AGE 14 (1932) Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself And friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. POLONIUS, TO HIS SON LAERTES, IN HAMLET BY WILLIAM...
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Shakespeare's Webs: Networks of Meaning in Renaissance Drama

Arthur F. Kinney - 2004 - 196 pages
...they in France of the best rank and station Are of all most select and generous chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be, For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all to thine own self be true, And...
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Poker Night: Winning at Home, at the Casino, and Beyond

John Vorhaus - 2004 - 292 pages
...scratch. Should you extend credit to Gatling Gary? I gotta go with my man Shakespeare on this: Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. Forgetting for the moment that you may never see...
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Multiple Voices in the Translation Classroom: Activities, Tasks and Projects

Maria González Davies - 2004 - 276 pages
...can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclaims the man. Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all: to thine own self be true, And it...
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Inspired English: Raising Test Scores and Writing Effectiveness Through ...

Lorraine LaCroix - 2005 - 161 pages
...every man thine ear. but few thy voice: Take each man's censure. but reserve thy judgement. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy. But not expressed in fancy: rich. not gaudy: For the apparel oft proclaims the man. And they in France of the best rank and station Are most select...
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Pushing to the Front

Orison Swett Marden - 2005 - 460 pages
...CHAPTER XV WHAT A GOOD APPEARANCE WILL DO Let thy attire be comely but not costly. LIVY. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not expressed in fancy; rich not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclaims the man, SHAKESPEARE. I hold that gentleman to be the best dressed whose...
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Hamlet : a Play in One Act

Lindsay Price - 2005 - 52 pages
...no tongue, Nor any unproportioned thought his act. Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar. Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all: to thine own self be true, And it...
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The Great Comedies and Tragedies

William Shakespeare - 2005 - 900 pages
...they in France of the best rank and station, Or of a most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be, For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry; This above all, to thine own self be true And it...
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World Without Civilization: Mass Murder and the Holocaust, History ..., Volume 1

Robert Melvin Spector - 2005 - 548 pages
...the records of accounts receivable. Master Shakespeare put it far better when he wrote that "Neither a borrower nor a lender be for loan oft loses both itself and friend."35 While the Jews lent money, they could not expect to have the well-wishes of the gentile...
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Whatever Floats Your Boat

Donna Fareed (Warfield) - 2005 - 55 pages
...thine own self be true," from William Shakespeare's Hamlet: The following is the entire quote: "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; for loan oft loses both itself and friend, and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all: to thine own self be true." In other...
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