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" Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. "
Merill's Word and Sentence Book: A Practical Speller Designed to Teach the ... - Page 118
by James Ormond Wilson - 1902 - 189 pages
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Beat the Craps Out of the Casinos: How to Play Craps and Win!

Frank Scoblete - 2005 - 206 pages
...Shakespeare's Hamlet is perhaps the best money management advice anyone can give a gambler: Neither a borrower nor a lender be, For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulleth the edge of husbandry. This above all, to thine own self be true, And...
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Sophia's Fire

Sango Mbella - 2005 - 304 pages
...it will last through a whole lifetime, if not asked to lend money. -Mark Twain (1835 -1910) Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all: to thine own self be true, And it...
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Telebomb: The Truth Behind the $500-billion Telecom Bust and What the ...

John Handley - 2005 - 280 pages
...just purchased the new PCS business at too high a cost. McLeodUSA: Creating a Debt Monster "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry." —WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, HAMLET, ACT I, SCENE III...
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Argument and Authority in Early Modern England: The Presupposition of Oaths ...

Conal Condren - 2006
...of Aristotelian definition by mean, most tellingly in his advice on the fixation with dress. 'Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,/ But not expressed in fancy; rich not gaudy;/ For the apparel oft proclaims the man;/ And they in France of the best rank and station/ Are of a most...
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Living Speech: Resisting the Empire of Force

James Boyd White - 2009 - 256 pages
...And they in France of the best rank and station Are most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all: to thine own self be true, And it...
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Growin' Up with Men and Machines

Henry E. Beck - 2005 - 630 pages
...they in France, of the best rank and station, are most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be: for loan oft loses both itself and friend; and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all, — to thine ovvnself be true; and...
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The Best-loved Plays of Shakespeare

Jennifer Mulherin, William Shakespeare, Abigail Frost - 2004 - 164 pages
...farewell to his son, advising him on how a young man should behave. Polonius's advice to his son \either a borrower, nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend. And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandIy. This aboz'e all: to thine own self be true, And...
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The Juice of Life

Tom Long - 2006 - 181 pages
...money to friends. Listen to them. "He who lends to a friend loses twice." — French Proverb "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all: to thine own self be true, And it...
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QuickSuccess Credit Miracle for Canadians: How to Build, Repair, and Improve ...

Douglas U. Idugboe - 2006 - 262 pages
...these possibilities take? Your credit rating of course! In the words of William Shakespeare, "neither a borrower, nor a lender be; for loan oft loses both itself and a friend." While that may have been correct or suitable in the Shakespearean age, it is absolutely...
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An Idler: John Hay's Social and Aesthetic Commentaries for the Press During ...

John Hay, Douglas Warren Hill - 2006 - 509 pages
...material and in mode, their attire was after the description of the old courtier of Ellsinore: Costly as thy purse can buy, But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy; And they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most select and generous in that. CARNIVAL SUPPER...
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