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" Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. "
Merill's Word and Sentence Book: A Practical Speller Designed to Teach the ... - Page 118
by James Ormond Wilson - 1902 - 189 pages
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The Traveller's Oracle, Or, Maxims for Locomotion: Containing ..., Volume 1

William Kitchiner - 1827 - 316 pages
...every man thine Ear, but few thy voice: Take each man's censure, butreserve the Judgment. m Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For Loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry: This, above all,—to thine own self be true; And...
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Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors, Volume 2

John Timbs - 1829 - 364 pages
...they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be: For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above id),— To thine ownself be true; And...
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Laconics; or, The best words of the best authors [ed. by J. Timbs ..., Volume 2

Laconics - 1829 - 360 pages
...they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be: For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry, This above all, — To thine ownself be true; Vol....
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A London Encyclopaedia, Or Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ..., Volume 4

Thomas Curtis - 1829
...slaine ! ا/يُيك. Yet of your royal presence HI adventure The borrow of a week. Sbakipeure Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend. And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. /•*• Go not my hone the better, I must become...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830 - 638 pages
...they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most select and generous, chief11 in that. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.' This above all, — To thine ovvnself be true...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1831 - 522 pages
...they in France, of the best rank and station. Are most select and generous,14 chief" in that Neither a borrower, nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry." This above all, — To thine ownself be true ;...
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The Cambridge Book of Poetry and Song: Selected from English and American ...

Mme. Charlotte Fiske (Bates) Rogé - 1832 - 1022 pages
...Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not expressed in fancy ; rich, not gaudy ; For the apparel oft proclaims the man ; And they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most...
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The Essayist: A Young Men's Magazine, Volume 1

George Washington Light - 1833 - 402 pages
...they in France, of the best name and station, Are most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou...
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The Book of Versions; Or, Guide to French Translation: With Notes, to Assist ...

J. Cherpilloud - 1833 - 272 pages
...lèvres, je jeterai mon gage, et je vaincrai en Douglas,' ou mourrai digne de lui, Cherpilloud. Neither a borrower nor a lender be: For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This, above all, to thine own self be true; And...
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King Lear. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare - 1836 - 534 pages
...every man thine ear, but few thy voice ; Take each man's censure,4 but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not expressed in fancy ; rich, not gaudy ; For the apparel oft proclaims the man ; And they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most...
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