Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. "
Merill's Word and Sentence Book: A Practical Speller Designed to Teach the ... - Page 118
by James Ormond Wilson - 1902 - 189 pages
Full view - About this book

Select plays from Shakspeare; adapted for the use of schools and young ...

William Shakespeare - 1836 - 628 pages
...in France, of the best rank and station, Are of a most select and generous chief,4 in that. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.5 This above all, — To thine ownself be true ;...
Full view - About this book

The Original, by T. Walker

Original - 1836 - 456 pages
...can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy : For the apparel oft proclaims the man. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all—to thine own self be true, And...
Full view - About this book

Gems of genius; or, Words of the wise: a collection of the most pointed ...

Andrew Steinmetz - 1838 - 362 pages
...Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit, as thy purse can buy, But not expressed...rich, not gaudy; Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For the apparel oft proclaims the man. For loan oft loseth both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls...
Full view - About this book

The wisdom and genius of Shakspeare: comprising moral philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 484 pages
...fancy; rich, not gaudy : For the apparel oft proclaims the man. 36 — i. 3. 633 The same. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry." 36— i. 3. 634 The same. To thine ownself be...
Full view - About this book

Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 3

Charles Dickens, William Harrison Ainsworth, Albert Smith - 1838 - 674 pages
...minds of smaller calibre than that of the Lord High Treasurer. Polonius takes higher ground. " Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry." Lord Burleigh gives us but the petty details,...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: King Lear. Romeo and Juliet ...

William Shakespeare - 1839
...every man thine ear, but few thy voice ; Take each man's censure,4 but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not expressed in fancy ; rich, not gaudy ; For the apparel oft proclaims the man ; And they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most...
Full view - About this book

The Wisdom and Genius of Shakespeare: Comprising Moral Philosophy ...

William Shakespeare, Thomas Price - 1839 - 460 pages
...fancy ; rich, not gaudy : For the apparel oft proclaims the man. 36 — i. 3. 633 The same. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be: For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.f 36— i. 3. 634 The same. To thine ownself be...
Full view - About this book

Literary Leaves; Or, Prose and Verse Chiefly Written in India, Volume 1

David Lester Richardson - 1840 - 352 pages
...lesson that a courtier learns. Let us quote another specimen of his paternal admonitions. " Neither a borrower nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. ' ' Polonius might have picked up this marvellous...
Full view - About this book

Literary Leaves, Volume 1

David Lester Richardson - 1840 - 354 pages
...lesson that a courtier learns. Let us quote another specimen of his paternal admonitions. " Neither a borrower nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.'' * Opinion, Polonius might have picked up this...
Full view - About this book

The Young Merchant

John Frost - 1840 - 314 pages
...can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy : For the apparel oft proclaims the man. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all—to thine own self be true, And...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF