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" Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. "
Merill's Word and Sentence Book: A Practical Speller Designed to Teach the ... - Page 118
by James Ormond Wilson - 1902 - 189 pages
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School Reader: 4th book

Charles Walton Sanders - 1842 - 316 pages
...every man thine ear, but few thy voice ; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy ; But not expressed in fancy rich, not gaudy ; For the apparel oft proclaims the man. 3. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be : For loan oft loses...
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Orthophony; Or, The Cultivation of the Voice, in Elocution: A Manual of ...

1847 - 312 pages
...Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice : Take each man's censure but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not expressed in fancy ; rich, not gaudy ; For the apparel oft proclaims the man : Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both...
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The American Mechanic and Working-man, Volume 2

James Waddel Alexander - 1847
...scale to moral and eternal things, which are above all price. XXXI. RISKS AND SPECULATIONS. " Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry." Hamlet. OF all the ways of making money, that which...
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Shakespeare's Plays: With His Life, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1847 - 870 pages
...they in France, of the best rank and station, Arc of a most select and generous chief in that. Neither hakespeare friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all, to thine ownself be true; And...
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King Lear. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare - 1848
...every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure, 4 but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not expressed in fancy ; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclaims the man; And they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most select...
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THE MIRROR MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

PERCY B. ST. JOHN - 1848 - 460 pages
...the end of summer. It is remarked with great terseness also by Shakespeare, who says " Neither a borrower nor a lender be, For loan oft loses both itself and friend." In order to preserve, therefore, this virtuous sentiment in its proper purity, and comeliness,...
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Shakspeare's Hamlet: An Attempt to Find the Key to a Great Moral Problem, by ...

Sir Edward Strachey - 1848 - 116 pages
...they in France of the best rank and station Are of a most select and generous chief in that. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be : For loan oft loses both itself and friend ; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This, above all, To thine ownself be true ;...
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The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction

1848 - 460 pages
...the end of summer. It is remarked with great terseness also by Shakespeare, who says " Neither a borrower nor a lender be, For loan oft loses both itself and friend." In order to preserve, therefore, this virtuous sentiment in its proper purity, and comeliness,...
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The Passions: Or, Mind and Matter

John Gideon Millingen - 1848 - 494 pages
...are too frequently the bane of friendship. Pollonius' injunctions to Laertes were most wise: "Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend: And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry." Not only does our friendship vary acccording to...
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Orthophony; Or The Cultivation of the Voice in Elocution: A Manual of ...

William Russell - 1849 - 320 pages
...Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice : Take each man's censure but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not expressed in fancy ; rich, not gaudy ; For the apparel oft proclaims the man : Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both...
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