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" Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle disquisition, for every purpose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working-men,... "
The baptist Magazine - Page 111
1832
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The Modern British Essayists: Macaulay, T.B. Essays

1852
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he 1< <X %} <m 0 C oŴ\=^ {A| 0 N& >` W w 0 ~ ʒ2 pN & R vYȅȐ •rery purpose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain...
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Critical, Historical, and Miscellaneous Essays and Poems, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1852 - 744 pages
...not contain a single word uf more than two syllables. Yet no writer has »aid more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle disquisition, for erery purpose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain workingmen,...
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The Life of John Bunyan

Stephen B. Wickens - 1853 - 344 pages
...he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehe* Montgomery's Essay. t Rev. Dr. Bacon. mcnt exhortation, for subtle disquisition, for every purpose...on which we would so readily stake the fame of the unpolluted English language : no book which shows so well how rich that language is in its own proper...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 1; Volume 37

1853
...more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtile disquisition, for every purpose of the poet, the orator,...divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working-men, was perfectly sufficient. There is no book in our literature on which we would so readily...
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English Literature of the Nineteenth Century: on the Plan of the Author's ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1853 - 785 pages
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...for subtle disquisition, for every purpose of the pout, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain workingmen, was perfectly...
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Rudiments of Public Speaking and Debate: Or, Hints on the Application of Logic

George Jacob Holyoake - 1853 - 129 pages
...exactly what he wanted to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtile disquisition, for every purpose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, this dialect of plain working-men, was sufficient. There is no book in our literature on which we would...
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The advanced prose and poetical reader, by A.W. Buchan

Alexander Winton Buchan - 1854
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...was perfectly sufficient. There is no book in our liierature on which we would so readily stake the fame of the unpolluted English language, no book...
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A Compendium of English Literature, Chronologically Arranged from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1854 - 776 pages
...and the divine, 1his homely dialect, the dialect of plain working-men. was perfi.t-rly HiidH'i-'nt. There Is no book in our literature on which we would so readily stake the fame of the iiiinnllulrd English language, no hook which shown BO well how rich that language IB In its own proper...
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Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire ..., Volumes 7-8

1855
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Tet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...was perfectly sufficient. There is no book in our literalnre, on which we would so readily stake the fame of oar old unpolluted English language ; no...
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European Historical Collections: Comprising England, Scotland, with Holland ...

John Warner Barber - 1855 - 568 pages
...obtain a wide command over the English language. The vocabulary is the vocabulary of the common people. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation,...dialect of plain working men, was perfectly sufficient Though there were many clever men in England during the latter half of the seventeenth century, there...
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