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" Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle disquisition, for every purpose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working-men,... "
The baptist Magazine - Page 111
1832
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Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire ..., Volume 8

Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire - 1856
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement...literature, on which we would so readily stake the fame of our old unpolluted English langunge ; no book that shews so well how rich that language is in its own...
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Discourses on Special Occasions, and Miscellaneous Papers :

Cornelius Van Santvoord - 1856 - 456 pages
...has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for every purpose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain working-men, was perfectly sufficient. There is no book in our literature on which we could so readily...
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Essays, Critical and Miscellaneous

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1856 - 744 pages
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle disquisition, for every parpóse of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain workingmen,...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1856 - 776 pages
...not contain a •ingle word of more Uian two syllables. Yet no writer lias said more exactly what be meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle lilsijuinlllon, for every purpose of ll'c poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the...
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Notes and Queries

1857
...man. Impugn it whoso list. " Of the Pilgrim's Progress, Mr. Macaulay, in his happy manner, writes : ' For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation,...the fame of the old unpolluted English language,' as the Pilgrim's Progress : ' no book which shows so well how rich that language is in its own proper...
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Macphail's Edinburgh ecclesiastical journal and literary review, Volumes 23-24

1857
...man. Impugn it whoso list. " Of the Pilgrim's Progress, Mr Mocaulay, in his happy manner, writes : ' For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation,...divine, this homely dialect — the dialect of plain workingmen — was perfectly sufficient. There ,s no book in our literature on which wo would so readily...
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English Literature of the Nineteenth Century: On the Plan of the Author's ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1857 - 785 pages
...more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for suhtle disquisition, for every purpose of the poet, the orator,...divine, this homely dialect, the dialect of plain workingmen, was perfectly sufficicnt. There is no hook in our literature on which we could so readily...
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McGuffey's New Sixth Eclectic Reader: Exercises in Rhetorical Reading, with ...

William Holmes McGuffey - 1857 - 448 pages
...do not contain a single word of more than two syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for '''vehement...''"exhortation, for ^subtle ^disquisition, for every purDose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely + dialect, the dialect of plain working...
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Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1848 - 776 pages
...not contain a (.ingle word of more than two (syllables. Yet no writer has said more exactly what he meant to say. For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation, for subtle disquiailion, for every- purpose of the poet, the orator, and the divine, this homely dialect, the...
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The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 204

1858
...man. Impugn it whoso list. Of the " Pilgrim's Progress," Lord Macaulay, in his happy nmnner, writes: " For magnificence, for pathos, for vehement exhortation,...the fame of the old unpolluted English language," as the " Pilgrim's Progress ;" " no book which shews so well how rich that language is in its own....
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