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" Immodest words admit of no defence ; For want of decency is want of sense. "
The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical - Page 215
edited by - 1779
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An Epitome of the Arts and Sciences: Being a Comprehensive System of the ...

William Duane - 1811 - 378 pages
...those of ten, eight, and sevea syllables, and various others. J:^. Give me an example of each. Immodest words admit of no defence, For want of decency is want of sense. KOSCOMMON. Verses of eight, which is an usual measure for short poems, And may at last my w«ary...
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The Evangelical Magazine, Volume 11

1803 - 652 pages
...spirit of moderation and calmness, reminding him, in the lauguage of a poet of our own, that " Immodest words admit of no defence; " For want of decency is want of sense." Would not this be as likely a method as any to convince him of the immoral tendency of (the...
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Letters, and Sketches of Sermons, Volume 1

John Murray - 1812 - 426 pages
...cowardly, ungetulemanly vices, and in the language of a moral poet, we uniformly affirm, that " Immodest words admit of no defence, For want of decency, is want of sense." There are two characters whom I should wish to serve, for whose spiritual and temporal interest...
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Rural discourses

William Clayton - 1814 - 420 pages
...breaking down the bank of a great river — vast and lasting is the misery that follows. " Immodest words admit of no defence, " For want of decency, is want of sense." He is a fool and madman, who throws about fire-brands, arrows and death, and says, Am I not...
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An Apology for the Life of James Fennell

James Fennell - 1814 - 544 pages
...on a slate, the two following lines of Pope, with which I was then totally unacquainted: " Immodest words admit of no defence, For want of decency is want of sense." As the master delivered them to me, I really did not understand what I was to write — I could...
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The Parliamentary History of England, from the Earliest Period to the Year ...

William Cobbett - 1815 - 746 pages
...Richard declared hehad no intention to beludicrous, agreeing perfectly with the poet, that " Immodest words admit of no defence, " For want of decency is want of sense." The. first resolution was agreed to, and then the Chancellor of the Exchequer moved a string...
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The Works of the Late Dr. Benjamin Franklin: Consisting of His Life Written ...

Benjamin Franklin - 1815 - 336 pages
...sense. If you ask why I say with less profiriety^ I must give you the" two lines together ; Immodest words admit of no defence, For want of decency is want of sense. Now want of sense, when a man has the misfortune tobe so circumstanced, is it not a kind of...
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Encyclopaedia Perthensis; Or Universal Dictionary of the Arts ..., Volume 20

1816 - 762 pages
...author makes an apology in a Latin epigram addreffed to the grammarians ; but as the poet obferves, Immodeft words admit of no defence, For want of decency is want of fenfe. * SECURE, adj. [jccurus, Latin.] I. Free from fear ; exempt from terror ; eafy ; allured. — Confidence...
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Encyclopaedia Perthensis; or, Universal dictionary of Knowledge ..., Volume 12

Encyclopaedia Perthensis - 1816 - 810 pages
...and learn'd ; which once at tain'd, Comes to no farther ufe But to be known and hated. took Immodejl words admit of no defence, For want of decency is want of fenfe. Re/can* 4. Unreafonable ; exorbitant: arrogant. IMM IMM • IMMODESTY, nf [immode/He, Fr. from imWant...
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Encyclopaedia Perthensis; or, Universal dictionary of Knowledge ..., Volume 20

Encyclopaedia Perthensis - 1816 - 746 pages
...author makes an apology in a Latin epigram addrelfed to the grammarians ; but as the poet obferves, Immodeft words admit of no defence, For want of decency is want of fcnfe. * SECURE, adj. [itcuruj, Latin,] i. Free from fear ; exempt from terror ; eafy ; allured. —...
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