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" At the same time, let the sovereign authority of this country over the colonies be asserted in as strong terms as can be devised, and be made to extend to every point of legislation whatsoever; that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures,... "
Littell's Living Age - Page 395
1849
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The History of Party: From the Rise of the Whig and Tory Factions ..., Volume 3

George Wingrove Cooke - 1837 - 694 pages
...legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. Thus, broadly and unhesitatingly, was Mr. Pitt's opinion upon this grand constitutional question delivered....
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Correspondence of William Pitt, Volume 2

William Pitt (Earl of Chatham) - 1838 - 516 pages
...legislation whatsoever : that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent." The address was agreed to without a division. BBS GEORGE ONSLOW, E8Q.(') TO MR. PITT. Curzon Street,...
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Correspondence, ed. by [W.S. Taylor and J.H. Pringle] the ..., Volume 2

William Pitt (1st earl of Chatham.), William Stanhope Taylor - 1838 - 534 pages
...legislation whatsoever : that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent." The address was agreed to without a division. BBS GEORGE ONSLOW, ESQ.(') TO MR. PITT. Curzon Street,...
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Correspondence of William Pitt, Volume 2

William Pitt (Earl of Chatham) - 1838 - 544 pages
...legislation whatsoever : that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent." The address was agreed to without a division. BBS GEORGE ONSLOW, ESQ.(') TO MR. PITT. Curzon Street,...
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Correspondence of William Pitt, Volume 2

William Pitt (Earl of Chatham) - 1838 - 550 pages
...laws, by her regulations and restrictions in trade, in navigation, in manufactures in every thing, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. Here I would draw the line, . "sunt certi denique fines, Quos ultra citraque ncquit consistere rectum."*...
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Lectures on Modern History: From the Irruption of the Northern ..., Volume 2

William Smyth - 1840 - 514 pages
...country be asserted : we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent." Such is a slight outline of what the greatest of our orators is understood to have delivered on this...
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History of the War of the Independence of the United States of America, Volume 1

Carlo Botta - 1840 - 520 pages
...legislation whatsoever ; that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.' These words, pronounced in a firm and solemn tone, by a man of so great authority, acted with extreme...
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The History of England: From the Accession to the Decease of King ..., Volume 1

John Adolphus - 1840 - 646 pages
...by her regu" lations and restrictions, in trade, in navigation, in " manufactures ; in every thing except that of taking " their money out of their pockets without their con" sent. Here I would draw the line, ' qiuim ultra " citraque nequit consistere rectum.' " A considerable...
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Celebrated Speeches of Chatham, Burke, and Erskine: To which is Added, the ...

William Pitt (Earl of Chatham) - 1841 - 548 pages
...legislation whatsoever ; that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. LORD CHATHAM'S SPEECH, C THE HOUSE OF LORDS, JANUARY 9, 1770, IN REPLY TO LORD MAJJSHELD. ON T11E...
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The Early History of New England: Illustrated by Numerous Interesting Incidents

Henry White - 1841 - 440 pages
...legislation whatever, that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power except that of taking their money out of their pockets, without their consent.' " On the eighteenth of March, the stamp act was repealed by the British government. News of this repeal...
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