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" Sirat. which they say is laid over the midst of hell, and described to be finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword... "
The Nile: Notes for Travellers in Egypt - Page 221
by Sir Ernest Alfred Wallis Budge - 1902 - 674 pages
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An Encyclopædia Ecclesiastica; Or, A Complete History of the ..., Volume 1

Thomas Anthony Trollope - 1834 - 578 pages
...required to pass after their trial on the day of judgment. It was supposed to be so narrow as to be finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword, and on all sides to be beset with briars and thorns. Over this bridge the good, they imagine, with...
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An Account of the Most Important and Interesting Religious Events: Which ...

John Warner Barber - 1834 - 408 pages
...bridge called in Arabic Al Sirat, which, they say, is laid over the midst of hell, and described to be finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword ; so .that it seems very difficult to conceive how any one shall be able to stand upon it. For this...
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The Religions and Religious Ceremonies of All Nations: Accurately ...

Joseph Nightingale - 1835 - 636 pages
...virtue or vice, will hang the lot of happiness or woe of every individual. .To the Bridge Al Sirat, finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword, both the guilty and the virtuous Moslems will then proceed ; the guilty will sink into hell that is...
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An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, Volume 1

Edward William Lane - 1836
...and evil works shall be weighed, and in the bridge Es-Sira't (which extends over the midst of Hell, finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword), over which all must pass, and from which the wicked shall fall into Hell. He believes, also, that they...
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The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal

1838
...Paradise, and the other over hell. The bridge called in Arabic al Sirdt, is, they say, laid over the midst of hell, and is finer than a hair and sharper than the edge of a sword, and those who cannot pass this bridge fall into hell." SALE'S /','. Disc. Is guided by the Guardian...
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Anecdotes and Traditions, Illustrative of Early English History, Derived ...

William John Thoms - 1839 - 166 pages
...bridge, called in Arabic, al Sirftt, which they say is laid over the midst of hell, and describe to be finer than a hair and sharper than the edge of a sword, so that it seems very difficult to conceive how any one shall be able to stand upon it ; for which...
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The Thousand and One Nights: Commonly Called, in England, The ..., Volume 2

1840
...The Sirat is the bridge which all must pass on the day of judgment, extending over the midst of hell, finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword. NOTE 42. See Note 55 to Chapter iii. CHAPTER XVI. COMMENCING WITH PART OF THE THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTYSEVENTH...
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The Thousand and One Nights: Commonly Called, in England, The ..., Volume 2

1840
...The Sirat is the bridge which all must pass on the day of judgment, extending over the midst of hell, finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword. NOTE 42. See Note 55 to Chapter iii. CHAPTER XVI. COMMENCING WITH PART OF THE THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTYSEVENTH...
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The Book of Religions: Comprising the Views, Creeds, Sentiments, Or Opinions ...

John Hayward - 1842 - 432 pages
...bridge called in Arabic al Sirat, which, they say, is laid over the midst of hell, and described to be finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword ; so that it seems very difficult to conceive how any one shall be able to stand upon it ; for which...
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The Book of Religions: Comprising the Views, Creeds, Sentiments, Or Opinions ...

John Hayward - 1845 - 443 pages
...bridge called in Arabic al Sirat, which, they say, is laid over the midst of hell, and described to be finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword ; so that it seems very difficult to conceive how any one shall be able to stand upon it; for which...
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