Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. "
The Defender - Page 257
1855
Full view - About this book

The British poets, including translations, Volume 80

British poets - 1822
...prized above all price, I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home — Then why abroad?...they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then,...
Full view - About this book

The task. [Followed by] Tirocinium: or, A review of schools

William Cowper - 1822
...be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home—Then why abroad ? And they themselves once ferried o'er...moment they are free; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. . That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then,...
Full view - About this book

Murray's English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the ...

Lindley Murray - 1822 - 304 pages
...priz'd above all price; 1 had much rather be myself <ne slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. * We have no slaves at home — then why abroad?...ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. , 6. Slaves cannot breathe in England: if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are...
Full view - About this book

The Works of the British Poets: With Lives of the Authors, Volume 36

Ezekiel Sanford, Robert Walsh - 1822
...priz'd above all price, I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home — Then why abroad...ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
Full view - About this book

The English Reader; Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry: Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - 1822 - 264 pages
...be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on htm. We have no slaves at home—then why abroad ? And they themselves once ferried o-er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe IT England : ii" their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
Full view - About this book

The Monthly Review

Ralph Griffiths, George Edward Griffiths - 1822
...the slave-trade, and speaks as follows: ' " We have no slaves at home — then why abroad ? . v "]) And they themselves once ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free;...
Full view - About this book

The American First Class Book, Or, Exercises in Reading and Recitation

John Pierpont - 1823 - 480 pages
...prized above all price, I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home — then why abroad...lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free; 16 182 THE AMERICAN [Lesso* They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks...
Full view - About this book

True happiness found only in the Christian life: letters

Andrew Reid (of London.) - 1824
...sold have ever earn'd. No, I would rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home, — then why abroad...they are free ; , They touch our country, and their shackles fall. COWPEH. Edinburgh, 2ith July, 1323 SLAVERY, horrific name ! torn from kindred and country,...
Full view - About this book

Poems

William Cowper - 1824
...slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home — then why abroad t And they themselves once ferried o'er the wave That...they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then,...
Full view - About this book

The Poetical Works of John Milton ...

John Milton - 1824 - 131 pages
...prized above all price, I had much rather be myself, the slave, And wear the bonds, tlum fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home— then why abroad...Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs JU'i « ! . i uur air, that moment they are free ; They touch our eountry, and their shackles fall....
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF