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" Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. "
The Defender - Page 265
1855
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The History of the Rise, Progress, and Accomplishment of the ..., Volume 1

Thomas Clarkson - 1808
...be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no Slaves at home—then why abroad ? And they themselves once ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
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The Panoplist (and Missionary magazine) conducted by an association of ...

1808
...Co-super emphatically apply to Maiiachiuettt r " SLAVES cannot breathe in Matsachusetts ; if their lunge Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble ! and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it, then,...
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Select Reviews of Literature, and Spirit of Foreign Magazines, Volume 1

Enos Bronson - 1809
...pride in claiming as an ancestor, than the man to whom we owe our power of repeating with truth— " Slaves cannot breathe in England. If their lungs Receive our air, that moment they ara free. They touch our country, and their shackles fall. Oh ! this is noble !" Solicitous, even to...
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Select Reviews, Volumes 1-2

1809
...power of repeating with truth — . " Slaves cannot breathe in England. If dieir lungs Receive oui- air, that moment they are free. They touch our country, and their shackles fall. Oh ¡"this is noble!" Solicitous, even to anxiety, as our author shows himself, in developing...
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - 1810 - 231 pages
...priz'd above all price ; I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home — then why abroad...ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
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Poems [ed. by J. Newton]. Illustr. with engr. from the designs of ..., Volume 2

William Cowper - 1810
...why abroad? And they themselves once ferried o'er the wave, That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free; 41 They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous...
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The Task: A Poem. In Six Books

William Cowper - 1810 - 193 pages
...slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home... .Then why abroad J And they themselves, once ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
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Poems, Volume 2

William Cowper - 1810
...slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home — >Then why abroad 1 And they themselves once ferried o'er the wave, That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
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The American Orator, Or, Elegant Extracts in Prose and Poetry: Comprehending ...

Increase Cooke - 1811 - 408 pages
...ri i.. .;;•:;.. :ii: And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him, We have no slaves at home—then why abroad ? And they themselves once ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England; if Their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
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The Task: A Poem in Six Books

William Cowper - 1811 - 212 pages
...slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home. ...Then why aboad ? And they themselves, once ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
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