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" Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. "
The Defender - Page 265
1855
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The American Orator, Or, Elegant Extracts in Prose and Poetry: Comprehending ...

Increase Cooke - 1819 - 408 pages
...themselves once ferried o'er the waves That part us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breath in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that...moment they are free; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then,...
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The baptist Magazine

1819
...And whatever are tlie defects of our Constitution in principle or in practice, thanks bo to God ' Slaves cannot breathe in England if their lungs...Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They roucli our country, aim their shackle^ full ; That's noble and bespeaks a nation pioud And jealous...
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The American Orator, Or, Elegant Extracts in Prose and Poetry: Comprehending ...

Increase Cooke - 1819 - 408 pages
...-,..-.- . I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, thut fasten them on him. \Ve have no slaves at home then why abroad ? And they themselves once ferried o'er the waves That part us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breath in England ; if their lungs Receive...
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Poems

William Cowper - 1820 - 480 pages
...priaed above nll price, I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home then why abroad...the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loosed. Staves caunot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free; They...
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Figures of Elocution exemplified; or, Directions for reading and reciting ...

Charles RICHSON - 1820 - 76 pages
...prized above all price ; 72 I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home then why abroad?...ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
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Poems, Volume 1

William Cowper - 1821
...prized above all price, I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home then why abroad...they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble ! and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then,...
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Select Works of the British Poets: With Biographical and Critical ..., Volume 9

John Aikin - 1821 - 807 pages
...priz'd above all price, I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home Then why abroad...ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free...
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - 1821 - 253 pages
...priz'd above all price ; I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home ; then why abroad...ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and l<> is'd. Slaves cannot Ijreathe in England : if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are...
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - 1821 - 263 pages
...price ; I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, thpn fasten fhem on him. We hare no slaves at home then why abroad ? And they themselves...ferried o'er the wave That parts us, are emancipate and loos'd. Slaves cannot breathe in England : if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they ;ire...
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The British poets, including translations, Volume 80

British poets - 1822
...prized above all price, I had much rather be myself the slave, And wear the bonds, than fasten them on him. We have no slaves at home Then why abroad?...they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then,...
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