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" Tempered to the oaten flute Rough Satyrs danced, and Fauns with cloven heel From the glad sound would not be absent long; And old Damoetas loved to hear our song. But, oh! the heavy change, now thou art gone, Now thou art gone and never must return !... "
An Introduction to the Prose and Poetical Works of John Milton: Comprising ... - Page 172
by John Milton, Hiram Corson - 1899 - 303 pages
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The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

Oxford University Press - 1992 - 1061 pages
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Western Wind: An Introduction to Poetry

John Frederick Nims - 1992 - 634 pages
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Selected Poems

John Milton - 1993 - 128 pages
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Understanding Psychology

Charles G. Morris - 1993 - 736 pages
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The Harbrace Anthology of Literature

1994 - 1906 pages
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The Promise of Rest

Reynolds Price - 1995 - 353 pages
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Annoying the Victorians

James Russell Kincaid - 1995 - 271 pages
...never must return!" (1. 38) and then by transferring the mourning activity from himself to nature: "Thee Shepherd, thee the Woods, and desert Caves,/ With wild Thyme and the gadding Vine o'ergrown,/ And all their echoes mourn" (11. 39-41). The blight is on nature, associated with the speaker only...
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Napoleon and English Romanticism

Simon Bainbridge - 1995 - 259 pages
...the passage evoke the literary tradition of elegy. We are reminded, for example, of Lycidas: But O the heavy change, now thou art gone Now thou art gone, and never must return . . . (lines 37-8, my italics) and: Shall no more be seen (line 43, my italics)'7 and of Lear grieving...
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The Columbia Anthology of British Poetry

Carl R. Woodring, James Shapiro - 1995 - 891 pages
...clov'n heel From the glad sound would not be absent long, And old Damaetas lov'd to hear our song. But O the heavy change, now thou art gone, Now thou art gone, and never must retum! Thee shepherd, thee the woods, and desert caves. With wild thyme and the gadding vine o'ergrown,...
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The Poetry Dictionary

John Drury - 1995 - 324 pages
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