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AMERICAN HISTORY:

COMPRISING

HISTORICAL SKETCHES OF THE INDIAN TRIBES ;

A DESCRIPTION OF

AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES,

WITH AN INQUIRY INTO THEIR ORIGIN AND THE ORIGIN OF

THE INDIAN TRIBES ;

HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES,

WITH APPENDICES SHOWING ITS CONNECTION WITH EUROPEAN HISTORY ;

HISTORY OF THE PRESENT BRITISH PROVINCES;

HISTORY OF MEXICO; ;

AND HISTORY OF TEXAS,

BROUGHT DOWN TO THE TIME OF ITS ADMISSION INTO THE AMERICAN UNION.

BY MARCIUS WILLSON,
AUTHOR OF SCHOOL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, COMPREHENSIVE CHART

OF AMERICAN HISTORY, ETC.

NEW YORK:
PUBLISHED BY MARK H. NEWMAN & co.,

No. 199 BROADWAY.

1847,

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ENTERED, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1846, by

MARCIUS WILL SON,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the

Northern District of New York.

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INTRODUCTION.

The design of the following work is to present the histories of all those countries of North America that are now of sufficient political importance to demand the attention of the scholar, and awaken the interest of the general reader. As an appropriate introduction to such a work, we have given the most important, of what little is known, of the history of the Aborigines of America, together with descriptive sketches of those rude memorials of a former civilization that were once so numerous throughout our own territory; and of others, magnificent even in their desolation, which now strew the plains, and crown the hill-tops, of Mexico, Yucatan, and Central America. The probable origin of these antiquities, and of the Indian tribes, has long been a subject of the antiquarian rescarches of the learned.

Of the histories of the several political divisions of North America, that of our own country claims our first attention, and to it we have given an appropriate space in the present work, commensurate with its importance. Its relations with European history, and with the history of England in particular, have been dwelt upon in the several appendices, at considerable length. To the article explanatory of the character and design of those appendices, see page 107, the reader is referred for our farther views on this subject.

The third part of the volume, or, as it is called, Book III., gives the history of the present British Provinces in North America, from their earliest settlement to the present period—both under the French and under the English dominion ;-the early history of Louisiana, previous to the purchase of that territory by the United States in 1803;—the history of Mexico, from the conquest by Cortez, to the commencement of the war with the United States in 1846 ;-and the history of Texas, from its first settlement, to the time of its admission into the American Union.

In relation to other features in the Plan of the work, farther than the general divisions to which we have referred, a few remarks may not be inappropriate. — It is a fact, not universally known, that all the French writers on Canadian hislory-the writers upon Mexican history-and generally, all Catholic writers, give dates according to the New, or Gregorian Style, subsequent to the year 1582; while cotemporary English writers of American and European history retain the Old Style so late as the year 1751. Hence discrepancies in dates, almost innumerable, are found in the works of those compilers who have either been ignorant of this fact, or have disregarded it. In the following work the author has endeavored to give the dates, uniformly, in New Style.

A minute MARGINAL ANALYSIS has been carried throughout the entire workeach subject being opposite that portion of the text to which it refers, and num

See this subject examined in a "Critical Review of American Historien," by the author of this work, published in the Biblical Repasitory of July, 1845.

bered to correspond with similar divisions of the text. The design of this arrange ment is to give the work a better adaptation to the purposes of instruction being better than questions for advanced pupils; while the teacher may easily convert each subject, or head, in the analysis, into a question if thought desirable. It is believed that this feature in the plan of the work will also prove highly acceptable to the general reader.

The marginal Dates and REFERENCES are numerous, carrying along a minuto chronology with the history. This plan avoids the necessity of encumbering the text with dates, and at the same time furnishes, to the inquiring reader, a history far more minute and circumstantiid than could otherwise be embraced in a volume much larger than the present. The supposed utility of the Chart, (pages 16 and 17,) may be learned from the explanation of the same on page 18.

The PROGRESSIVE Series of the three Large Maps, on pages 20, 432, and 502, shows the state of the country embraced in the present United States at different periods. The First represents it as occupied by the Indian tribes, fifty years after the settlement of Jamestown, when only a few bright spots of civilization relieved the darkness of the picture. The Second as it was at the close of the Revolution, when almost the entire region west of the Alleghanies was a wilderness-showing how slowly settlements had advanced during the long period that the colonies were under the dominion of Great Britain. The Third represents the country as it now is, and as it has become under the influence of republican institutions. In place of the recent wilderness, we observe a confederacy of many states, each with its numerous cities, towns, and villages, dencting the existence of a great and happy people.

The GeograPHICAL AND HISTORICAL Notes and SMALL MAPS, at the bottoms of the pages, give the localities of all inportant places mentioned, and furnish that kind of geographical information respecting them, without which the history can be read with little interest or profit. Maps of important sections of the country, the vicinities of large towns, plans of battle grounds and sieges, &c., are here given on the same pages with the events referring to them, where they necessarily catch the eye of the reader, so that they can hardly fail to arrest his attention, and increase the interest that he feels in the history. The map of Mexico, page 558, has been drawn with care, and being little more than an outline of the political divisions of that extensive country, is probably sufficiently accurate. Our knowledge of the geography of Mexico, however, is yet exceedingly imperfect, and little reliance can be placed upon maps for the distances between places. The map of Texas, page 620, and the several small maps of particular sections of that country, will be found a great aid to the reader in perusing the history of that portion of our Republic. In addition to what are properly " embellishments,” nearly ninety maps and charts, large and small, have been introduced, seven of which occupy entire pages; and nearly six hundred localities, mentioned in the history, have been des. cribed in the geographical notes. And unless the reader has as much knowledge of these localities as can be derived from the notes and maps, his knowledge of the history will be exceedingly vague and unsatisfactory. For if the names of places mentioned in history convey to our minds no meaning, they might as well be omitted entirely, and fictitious names would answer equally well. A familiarity with Hities is indispensable to the ready acquisition, and the subsequent retention, of

knowledge.

CONTENTS AND PLAN

OF THE WORK

CHAPTER I.

INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA.

Bactros I. NORTHERN TRIBES. Esquimaux and Athapascas.-Jurisdiction over their territory.

Tribes in the interior and on the coast.
ExcTios II. ALGONQCIN TRIBES. Montagnars.-Algonquins.-Knisteneanx.-Ottawas.- Pon-

tiac.-Missís aguies.-Micmacs.-Etchemins.-Åbenakes.- New England Indians, (Massa-
chusetts, Pawtuckets, Nipmucks, Pokapokets, and Narragansetts.) Massasoil.-- Caunbi.
tani.- Canonicus.- Phantonomoh.Ninigret.- Sassamon. - Philip.- Canonchet.— Annawon.
Mohegan Tribes, (Pequods, Montauks, Manhattans, Wabingas, &c.) Uncas. --Sassacus.-
Lepni Lenapes, (Minsi and Delawares, White Eyes.- Captain Pipe.-Nanticokes.-Sus-
quehannocks.-Mannahoacks.--Powhatan tribes. — Porrhatan Pocahontas.--Shawnees...
Cornstalk.- Tecumsch.-Miamis and Pinckishaws.- Little Turtle.-Illinois.-Kickapoos.-

Saes and Foxes.- Black Hawk.-Potowatomies.--Menonomies.
SECTION III. IRoQroIS TRAES. Hurons, (Wyandots, Neutrals, Erigas, Andastes, - Adario.-

Five Nations, (Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas.) Garangula.-
Hendrick.- Logan.- Thayendanega.--Shenandoa.- Red Jacket.-Furmer's Brother.

Corn Planter .- Half Town.- Big Tree.–Tuscaroras.
SECTIOX IV. Catawbas.-Cherokees.- Sequoyah. - Speckled Snake.--Uchees.-Natehes.
SECTION V. MOBILIAN TRIBES. Muscogees or Creeks, (Seminoles, Yamassees, &e.)-Mc.

Gillirray - Weatherford.-McIntosh.-- Osceola.--Chickasas.- Moncatchtape.--Choctas.-

Meshalatubee.-Pushamata.
SECTION VI. DANCOTAH OB SIOUX TRIBES. Winnebagoes.-- Assiniboins, and Sioux Proper.-

Minetaree Group, (Mipetarees, Mandans, and Crows.)-Southern Sioux Tribes, (Arkansas,
Osages, Kanzas, lowas, Missouries, Otoes, and Omahas.)-Other Western Tribes, (Black

Feet, Rapids, and Pawnees.)- Petalesharoo.-Oregon Tribes.

SECTION VII. Physical Character, language, Goveroment, Religion, and Traditions of the

Aborigines.

Pages, 21–62

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